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is from 10 minutes from one of the obama homes. so beatrice has been an interpreter, today and tomorrow. >> this is -- >> there's another member of my team, too, who was my wife who came along. she is an environmentalist, terrific environmentalist who i met about seven years ago and is gone on almost every major trip i've taken since then. i'm not a growth or anything but i seem like one compared to my wife, who is the best goodwill ambassador any person could ever have. so she makes friends where ever we go. >> we are going to get to her but i've one question before that. which is, this is not a cheap trip. >> right. >> you, number one, had to get over here. people on staff, full-time, for a number of weeks. >> right. >> does and authors advanced cover all of this, or just a portion? >> well, i can't speak for every author, and this is my 10th book, and i get enough of an advance to pay for all of this. i have, my own, as an author i have a corporation which is me and linda, so that has funds that i can use for all of this stuff. and i do spend, you know, why do it if you're not going
controversial. there are people that were very upset. obama won in a landslide. but everywhere in the world, there is some controversy about any politician. so there are some questions about it. but not everyone understands. >> what was his lifelike in jakarta? >> guest: he is perfectly immersed. imagine a six-year-old child being immersed in the culture. sort of a lower middle class action. the exotic smells of jakarta. his father riding a motorbike to his job. his mother was there as well. that was his wife, life, he adapted. he had to adapt. but he did the best he could. >> host: why did he leave jakarta in 1971? >> guest: his mother couldn't afford to send them there. those 3.5 years, he is in indonesia, immersed in the language. the mother is waking up at 4:00 a.m. to teach him with english schoolbooks to supplement his learning. it is very difficult. and the whole process was something that she realized that she loved indonesia, she was still married, she wanted to stay. but it was coming to a point where she had to make a key decision. it turned out that he could get into the best el
of michele obama. this is about 45 minutes. >> good evening. welcome. it is a delight to have you here, rachel, and to have all of you here. it's a lovely summer evening, and it is getting hot out there. summer will now descend upon us. we have a special treat in store for you. as you probably have read and heard about recently the book rachel swarm was written "american tapestry." i am looking forward to hear hearing about the process of this book. to begin i think what the audience probably doesn't know is that we have a lot of support, kind of a community of behind-the-scenes players. starting with the genealogist then a fellowship and maybe just to get started let's talk about the book itself and how we arrived at this amazing story. >> you know, i wrote a story in october of 2009 about the first lady's family. that became the genesis of this book. i am a journalist. this is my first book. this is a new experience for me. >> congratulations. >> thank you. [applause] really, when i thought to do this i kind of
, national politics, immigration, the presidential campaign of 2004, and 2008, and first lady michele obama and her role in the obama white house. i met rachel at an event this year where i bought a book, the book she wrote, "american tapestry: the story of the black, white, and multiracial ancestors of michelle obama". after hearing her talk, i'd bought six more copies. i bought them for all my family members and to give out as christmas gifts. now after having read her book i can tell you it was a good investment. it helps me better understand my own family and many mysteries surrounding my own family. rachel l. swams's book is a compelling story that stirs deep emotions. it is also a story that would break them here and with that, let's welcome rachel l. swams. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. >> thank you for coming. in the years leading up to the presidential election, the focus seems to be on barack obama's roots and his family and the fact that he wrote his own biography. now in your book "american tapestry," you put the focus on michele obama. tell us about how you got started do
obama. you just put a posted on it. inside of it, another envelope and says to 44 from 43. and the next morning is a picture of barack obama reading that actual no. the procession for the capitol is always a big deal. the move along pennsylvania avenue. here's a picture from exactly 100 years ago, an open carriage, and that's william howard taft on the right and then the president, woodrow wilson, on the left. 1933 we have a situation with franklin d. roosevelt and her hoover. the two of them did not along so well. there was not a lot of conversation during their right to the capital. in many pictures that were taken at stake, roosevelt can be seen waving to the crowd or smiling to the crowd or turning toward hoover and trying to have a conversation, but in every picture you'll ever see hoover is looking straight ahead ignoring him. there have been other times for the president bill did not get along so well. that chapter is called can't we all belong. sometimes it whether it -- weather is a big issue. there in the carriage. and here is the route that they take, pennsylvania avenue
and this was no exception for president obama. american tapestry, jody kantor wrote the obamas and david maraniss's first volume of his biography, "barack obama: the story" came out as well. >> whenever there's a sitting president is a boon for publishers who can jump on a bandwagon and publish as many books as possible. it was interesting to me because it fell into the early life of barack obama from his childhood when he was a student in new york, his early organizing days and data thorough job talking with a plethora of different people who knew the president in his early life. there was quite a bit of reporting and investigation about the marriage between barack and michele obama. from what i and stand rachel took a larger view looking at the first lady and her larger ancestry and putting together a larger story as a result. >> go ahead. >> if i can jump in, my favorite was david maraniss. it was exhaustive and exhausting. he goes into every detail and it ends as obama is going to harvard. so it is very much a coming of age biography, early parts of the president's life, very well researched. a book
that has a governor deval patrick and living in a country with president barack obama. one of the reasons you just stated in creating better access to both educational opportunities and health care which is eliminating all of those other disparities. it's important we not upset about the 99% of the 47% and just remember that there are people behind all of those percentages, and people that has been struggling and people living in poverty. if you talk about the shrinking middle class, who were the joining? and so i want a president and governor and a major that believes in making those critical investment in physical infrastructure and in people that support the rule that everyone has to play in the economy including giving people in poverty on a pathway to self-sufficiency that is just as important. >> a round of applause for the panel. [applause] jim bendat correspondent for msnbc come i tv and sky news is next on booktv. for the next half hour, he talks of the history of presidential inauguration going back to 79. -- 1789. >> thank you for that introduction. it's wonderful to be here at
president barack obama says vaccines might cause autism that was ignored. and yes he did say that and we will talk about that later in the top. so, there's been several books published on the topic. there's a couple of their books. if you want to find out how the right is better and it's a big market for that to our knowledge this is the first book on the entire scientific left. so, progressives are antiscience as well. let's give -- progressives are antiscience as well what is just not reported by the media. the media looks the other way when their political allies do things that are antiscience. so who are the progressives, what do we mean by progressive? we took david's chart and we label it to fit more of our political ideology today. conservatives and libertarians are the easiest to identify and they are the mainstream republican party. libertarians need no introduction. the ron paul revolution in the constitution. bill left, however, is a little bit trickier to define because i see them as splitting into liberals and conservatives, liberals and progressives of the liberals being mo
of books, current presidents and this year is no exception for president obama. rachel swansboro ran about mrs. o'connor called american tapestry. jodi cantor wrote the eponymous and david marinus first half of his biography of president obama, barack obama the story came out as well. >> guest: yes, whenever there is a sitting president it is a print for publishers who can jump on a bandwagon in publishes many books as possible. in the interesting because it helped them them to be shouted to a student in a year to his early organizing days and really did a thorough job in terms of talk with a full plethora of people in his early life. jodi cantor did a lot of recording an investigation with your book about the marriage between barack and michelle obama and rachel swarms took a larger view, looking at the first lady and her lurcher ancestry in putting together a lurcher story is the result. >> host: bob, go ahead, please. >> guest: i was going to jump in. of those three may paper with marinus. in my review i read of this exhaustive and exhausting. he goes into every detail and his and his o
and said i contributed to barack obama two weeks ago to his campaign. [laughter] but it was not a political point, it was a narrative that appointment. they thought i had the right experience to protect us giant bailout from criminal fraud. >> neil barofsky, when you look back at the administration itself, not how it was administered, but the legislation, what were some of the flaws come interview? >> i think what often happens, it is understandable given the sense of emergency this was a hastily crafted bill. one of the things as it had a lot of policy goals in the bill. but it didn't have the mechanisms -- he didn't mandate certain mechanisms to carry out those policies. for example, the idea behind t.a.r.p. is that it was going to help expand the economy. money wasn't is going to the bank, it was going to the bank's for the purpose of broader economic recovery. but he gave a tremendous amount of discretion to the treasury department to carry out this policy. to ultimately adopt these policies that disconnected, you know, the program goals and how the program perform. so we have a housing
on a limb here and it will tell you where we are in tribal politics that when barack obama praised mccain and six, and need to see a republican senate immediately sent an e-mail to "politico" saying that kills the land. if he is for it, work instead. this is less about ideology now than tribalism. so that's the challenge we have and it's not encouraging moderates are providing space. it's intimidating them. getting into the question of every time i get people who live congress, look at republicans in the psyche been inside a tent we are breathing a gas and suddenly you're outside and say how could i have done not? how could i have acted that way? whenever ideas is to create a shadow congress that consists of former members who span the spectrum, to start a common set of facts and have them debate not in the way congress used to because congress is never a great debating society, the genuine debates and discussions that are going to have huge audiences but can provide a model for how voters who yearn to have a discussion about options are. you conservative notion that there is somethin
us running down the road so we accept whatever obama wants otherwise we failed the fiscal cliff how can you be a patriotism if you don't what the fiscal cliff requires and they will tell us much like the land of oz. there will be the person hiding the behind the machine that say raise taxes now. and if you don't raise taxes now you violated the fiscal cliff. do you want to be the person who stands up and destroying america? do you want to go on one of the national networking and explain your reactionary and out of touch with life you don't care that america is going to die late on thursday? [laughter] it's all right if that's kind of person you are. we're never going schedule you. you will be never on television. you are clearly weird. [laughter] let me start with the idea and say there is no fiscal cliff. we had a bad election. we did a number of stupid things. we faced an opponent smarter than we were. ronald reagan when he was most important single statement is february 1975 in washington at the conservative political action committee meeting. now i was part of this. i ran in '74
, john if you come back with the deal, that you fashioned with obama this doesn't get more than say 100 votes or so and the republicans, cancer has cantor has started a whispered campaign and you are going to be -- we saw it happen with speaker gingrich and it can happen here. boehner walked away from a deal shortly after that. >> i want to come to the interplay between the leadership on the republican side in in a second but i have to ask this based on what you said. i think you know the president gave what was initially an off the record interview to the "des moines register" editorial board, speaking although he did not get the endorsement of that paper in one of the things he said in the interview was he believed he could get a grand bargain struck on the debt ceiling if he were reelected on november 6. a son what you're saying they may not be possible if if the freshman and now sophomores and many members who come and don't eventually give a nether blessing to cut a deal. in her may feel in the same tough spot now that but he was last year. a ground part and based on what you say m
became a sort of, you know, obama in 20002-9 delivered his famous new beginning speech. he said he would stand with the arab people against tyranny and made a number of very strong statements which probably was expecting to be called upon so soon. dino, at the time you have cereal looking as the sequential arab revolts came, there were very few places where the united states had uneasy or even a conceivable h to come in and do something where the consequences were not dramatic or at least there could be a positive. egypt was a longtime ally and banker in the middle east, supportive of israel. tunisia was a little better, but by that point it had crossed the threshold. syria, the comparisons with libya are quite, you know, it's very different. it's multi sectarian society with lots and lots of connections to other plot powers . lebanon, israel, disrupting or changing that relationship could have all sorts of consequences which are unknown. so libya presented -- was unique in that the libyans have a popular uprising. there was a program that had been put forth by a small group of people wh
for this empty mantra of hope and change. the obama administration was going to be that transcendent administration that got us all together. that is why barack obama earned the white house because he was going to be the great uniter. remember that inaugural address where he said to conservatives, i want to listen to you, especially when we disagree. he was going to meet with conservatives in congress want to wreak. he met twice. so three days after that beautiful speech, the conservatives in congress came to the white house and had a meeting and eric cantor, congressman from virginia articulated the conservative perspective on increasing taxes, that we shouldn't do that. you know what obama said three days after a point to listen to you, especially when they disagree? he said i want come at you last time i trump on that. a week later he said i want the folks who got us in this mess to do a whole lot less talking and a lot more listening. you can talk a little bit, but i want you to stand beside mine while we clean this up for you. unbelievable, condescending notion of unifying the c
the obama administration that hasn't been well covered by the media and i learned a lot from doing this and during the campaign president obama talked about the gold at the end of the war in iraq and we certainly took down the troops but what i discovered in doing the book is actually the administration policy objectives in iraq, the narrow objectives went far beyond taking out the troops that extended to remake the government and creating the power-sharing arrangement that included the failed effort to negotiate an agreement of american forces to stay in iraq. >> they tried to negotiate one and i tell that story so having failed to negotiate the agreement they claimed the credit but initially they did try to negotiate something to keep a modest number of troops initially 10,000 then later 5,000 a whole variety of reasons it didn't work out. but that -- i cover the start of the war and really the end game for the american military involvement. >> michael gordon, you said you covered the entire war for the new york times. at one point they owned a house over there did and they in ba
of legal writing. um, i wanted to ask you, president obama's talked about the need for judges with empathy. and i wallet today ask you, have -- i wanted to ask you, have judges strayed from the role they should be playing, and what do you think of president-elect obama's plans for appointing judges? >> guest: well, i'm a little -- i would be even more concerned about obama's view of judges except for the fact that the likely resignations from the supreme court are the liberals. they're the age to begin retiring. so his appointments would probably be younger liberals replacing older liberals on the supreme court. where obama's views are going to be, have real impact are in the lower federal courts. now, that's important because almost none, almost none of the cases in the lower federal courts get to the supreme court. i forget, there are tens of thousands of cases every year in the lower federal courts, and the supreme court takes about 80 which means that most to have laws being made by lower courts which obama will have a chance to, to affect. and he has said that he wants judges -- in th
obama be immediately notified of the senate's action and the senate then resume legislative session. the presiding officer: is there an objection? without objection. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent the senate proceed to the consideration of calendar number 575 s., 3454. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: calendar number 475, s. 3454, a bill to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2013 for intelligence and intelligence-related activities, and so forth and for other purposes. the presiding officer: is there objection to proceeding to the measure? without objection. mr. reid: thanks, mr. president. i ask unanimous consent that a feinstein-chambliss substitute amendment which is at the desk be agreed to, the bill as amended be read a third time and passed, and the senate proceed to vote on passage of this measure. the presiding officer: without objection. the substitute amendment is agreed to. and the clerk will read the bill as amended a third time. the clerk: calendar number 475, s. 3454, a bill to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2013 for intellige
. >> if, god forbid, we get obama for four or more years -- [laughter] what would you suggest that we promote as -- [inaudible] >> president bush is, has been really add publishly nonpartisan, and i think he's -- >> [inaudible] >> i agree. and i have to say he focuses very much on substance. and the one thing that i can say is that if you focus enough on substance, then you can convince anybody because the arguments are so sensible. and i think our objective as policymakers and as think tankers and do tankers, whatever we're going to call ourselves, is to make convincing arguments. because there have been times when convincing arguments have won regardless of who's in the white house. and i think the fact is that unemployment is so high right now that, you know, we're really desperate for good ideas. and i've got say that if you looked, the new york times gave this book a kind of rave review. now, i know "the new york times" is famous for being in the tank for president bush -- [laughter] but i think that they probably did that because they recognize the gravity of our current circums
, the point has made it somewhat harder for the obama of ministration to wind down the detention operations than they had initially predicted. myth number one, joint control. at least for non afghan citizens who are not in afghanistan it looks like guantanamo. myth number two, there are bullets flying. i don't here to say that it is a myth that there are bullets flying in afghanistan. of course there are. still active combat operations, still violence every day, assaults on u.s. troops, but with the d.c. circuit said was it would be preposterous to think that the government would intentionally in danger these detainees by holding them somewhere where they were subjected to violence and that we really should not be thinking about the role of the court into fair with active combat operations. the problem with that statement is that it lies the extent to which the detainees in question were not picked up by the military. there were not picked up on the battlefield. two of them were captured in europe, when north africa, and there were transported into harm's way, not out of harm's way. so ther
of president obama in the first lady. and they look at the genealogy of michele obama. then david maraniss in his book on barack obama. later, the white house videographer for the first two years of the obama presidency. >> you don't always find many in any area embracing investigative reporting. it's not just economics. if the discomfort that it often causes. because it is troublesome. it is more than economics if you are going to ruffle the feathers of someone powerful. that gives those people running into complaints of the publisher. we were very fortunate through the 70s and almost all of our prayers. let the chips fall where they may. >> donald bartlett and james steele will take your calls and e-mails and tweets next month on internet. they began their collaborative work in the 70s and are the co-authors of seven books. watch live at noon eastern on booktv on c-span2. >> someone put these missiles in cuba. the united states discovers that. then the tension builds. one of the things that happens during that time that a soviet submarine is found by american ships they knocked out the e
demagoguery from the seventies to obama." she talks to guests and signs books at americans for tax reform here in washington. this is about 20 minutes. >> he ordered his on amazon. spent how are you? are we going to sign that later? okay. hello. hello. thanks for coming. >> thanks for writing the book. >> nice to meet you. hello. hello. spent nice to meet you. >> gary johnson? no, no, no, no. you've got to be a romney girl now. >> how are you? good to see you. >> my own newspaper held me over and i was explaining, it's rude to lose your watch in the middle of an interview. it's like a half hour later. spent do you know brian? >> i haven't seen in such a long time. why wouldn't you have me on? we are? that's great, that's great because i will be in new york for that. hello. i will see you later. that was good. do you know who it is dedicated to? >> no. >> it's a crackerjack surprise inside. has your husband read it yet? spent he's busy. leave him alone. >> he changed his e-mail address on the, by the way. spent i don't know what your e-mail is. >> both of you change your e-mail address on it. i
story of how obama fought back against the team party. is the showdown referring to any specific incident or just politics in general? >> kind of both. the book is a behind-the-scenes account of what happened in the white house after the november 2010 election when republicans in the tea party through barack obama for lubber and controlled the house and everything that happened after that, the fight's over the budget and the debt ceiling and a deficit-reduction, also the reading and what happened in egypt and libya, and so i'm looking at how obama made the decisions he made and why he took the actions he took in that very perilous time politically but i also explained how this is all done in a way to set up the 2
and including mr. obama. if you will just follow my policies, these presidents have all said, not only will you get out of the current economic mess , but we will thereby make sure that this kind of economic crash does not affect our children. every president has promised it, no president has yet delivered on a promise. everyone has failed. we cannot control the. from monetary policy to fiscal policy, the federal reserve, stimulus program. we were not supposed to have this crisis. when it began to be clear that we are heading into a real doozy we were told by mr. bush and his advisers that it was just in the housing market and the sub prime mortgage and it would all work out. nothing to worry about. the federal reserve has just decided on the quantitative easing program number three. the only reason they're pumping money in for the third time is because the first to didn't work the reason you had to have multiple stimuli was because they didn't work. so it's a very stable -- unstable system. it is not clear what that is about except that it is very deep, built-in, and the reason we know that is
it a race riot, racist riot occurring by the -- well, it was not that. anti-obama students, pro-romney students came out onto the campus and demonstrated. the right, they can do that against the results of the election, and a handful of students were screaming out racial slurs. putting that in context, then the next day three times that amount of people showed up for a candlelighter is mopeny protesting the -- ceremony, protesting the incident the night before. so mississippi was, mississippi is. it's moving on. but, yes, you're right. there's more and more that should come out and talk about it. so you can get a balanced picture that their view of the south may not be the correct view today. it's not just a bunch of rioters throwing bricks. thank you. john. >> henry, can you talk a little more about the special security detail that you had following, you know, your initial -- >> sure. >> -- and how were, i assume you were just chosen for that, but was there -- do you know why you were chosen for that? >> well, i'd gone through the -- >> how did it end? >> yeah, yeah, thank you.
remember president obama's speech in 2004. the democratic national convention the dazzling masterpiece that instantly makes him a national figure. four years later was about the speech he's not a pauseble candidate for the presidency. he gives a dazzling speech in new york. when he ran for the senate when president obama gave the speech in 2004 he was running for the senate in senate in jill. illinois he lost. think about president obama run for the presidency in 2008 if he had lost the illinois senate election. in illinois lincoln is from illinois. the land of lincoln. huge hometown advantage for him. the reason they put it in chicago by one vote, by the way, think voted to put in chicago by one vote. could have been one vote hasn't concerned it. once it's -- in they weren't worried about the home court advantage. it wasn't a player. right. >> they were lists published by major newspaper and ten major candidates. tell us about the two republican frontrunners. he is a duo-term senator from new york. and new york is the biggest. >> most power of state like california today. it's the fou
% chance barack obama is president if you didn't know anything about it and watson would read the same page and go there is a 56% chance barack obama is president. it did not do as good job but it has read two hundred billion pages and may be 100,000 -- >> host: a computer that -- [talking over each other] >> guest: it is within three seconds can access all of the knowledge in those two hundred billion pages at its level of understanding. even though that level is below human, the scale is beyonce human. we can't read that many pages and remember it all. if we can even get through it. that level of understanding is going to gradually get better. my contention is by 2029 it will surpass human intelligence and read billions of pages. watson is the adapted to read medical journal articles and be a medical diagnostician and consulting system that will read everything, doctors can't read everything. articles come out every day. that is where we are headed. >> host: we will have the software systems that will exist in multiple forms, independently as well as things that can communicate with us an
post racial? >> they are an idiot. there is a big debate about this when obama was selected by the democrats but we are beyond thinking about issues of race. so even the presence of all all, and the family raises racial questions for some people. so on the way to be post racial but it is fair to say that we are not now. >>host: do you have a relationship with president of, now? >>guest: no. t. levin. her most recent book former chairwoman here is the
was served at dinner, what michelle obama were, who was there and what was senator so-and-so really like? what obama said to you when he shook her hand and what about that spoon that fell onto your jacket? today we pick up the cell and call someone and we have lost the more we tax someone and we don't describe the ambience, the music. we will say a obama obama cool or senator so-and-so. 200 years ago bibas it down and composed several lengthy letters that provided the nuance, the context. we know what the weather was uncertain days during george's life because he took notice of the weather. we know how many hoc said head of cattle he slaughtered on a particular day. he bortell down. today we are losing all that and the internet provides a great way for all of us to do our research. the internet provides a way of connecting people but also with all the new technology we could be losing a lot so historians and another 100 years are going to have a rough time. today we seem to be extra cognizant of the impact of the damning letter. i think historically to some extent also, one thing george
association with the obama campaign? >> well, in 2008 on the obama campaign i was his personal videographer which is something i carried through to the first two and a half years of the white house. and this last cycle, actually, did not work on the campaign formally or at the white house, i worked in that new and strange, murky world of super pacs and pac and independent can expenditures. >> talk to us about the campaign in 2008. how'd you get hooked up with the president? >> well, there was an ad in craig's list -- no, that's actually not the case. it was right place, right time. a friend of mine was working at cnn as a documentary producer, and that's kind of a more normal path. i was a fiction film maker, not really first on anyone's list. so she knew e e really wanted to get involved is and brought me in, and then i just hit it off with the senator and started traveling, you know, inside the bubble. >> and how long did you do it? i mean, was it 24/7 for you for a while? >> you know, especially in, on the campaign it really felt like 24/7. i was technically living in chicago, but i was
. [laughter] even more surprisingly, and this is sort of a newish post-obama phenomenon, is the sense, is the growing sense of victimization. and you say sort of -- you may sort of be taken aback by that, how can a billionaire feel victimized, but they really do. and i'll give you a few examples. there's a guy that's an activist investor actually doing great things. he is the guy who is behind marisa mayer becoming the ceo of yahoo! really as an investor does great things. in december 2010 he sent an e-mail to his friends, and the subject heading was battered wives. and the battered wives were the wall street financiers who were accepting the abuse of president obama. and the e-mail actually says it's sort of written in the voice of a battered wife, and it says he really loves us, and when he hits us, he doesn't mean it, and most of the time the bruises don't show. and it goes on in that vein, really seriously comparing themselves to battered wives. another guy who i spoke to called t.j. rogers, founder of a semiconductor company, said to me that he feels that the victimization of the
terrorist attacks. in the obama administration the state that the attacks were security related and it didn't involve a protest prior to the attack which were unanticipated in their scope and intensity. a dispatch from the command center and the state department bureau of economic security on the day of the attack clearly reported it as a terrorist event and they refuse to recognize and label the attacks both during and after september 11th for what it was. they find that the failure in the leadership and management reached the senior levels and resulted in a security posture at the diplomatic compound that was an adequate for benghazi and grossly inadequate to deal with the attacks that took place. this wasn't the result of insufficient information, or a lack of warning. as they clearly state, the responsible officials at the state department overlook mounting evidence that the security situation in benghazi was a deteriorating. they ignored the series of attacks against the western interest in the months and weeks leading up to 9/11 and failed to respond to the urgent request and pressing
think someone is an. there's a big debate about this when obama was selected by the democrats ended assorted out down now. the idea is we are beyond noticing are thinking about issues of race. i guess that is what that means. obviously we are. too many things have happened. even the presence of, and the white house raises racial questions for some people say that while we may be on the way some day to be post-racial, i think it is fair to say we are not now. >> host: do have relationship with president obama? >> guest: not really, no. >> host: "and justice for all," her most recent book i'm a professor at the university of pennsylvania. former chairwoman of the u.s. commission on civil rights. here's a history of the u.s. commission on civil rights. very frances berry on booktv on c-span 2. >> now another interview from the university of pennsylvania. stephanie mccurry sat down to discuss her book about her reckoning, looking at internal politics during the civil war and the influence the southern limit of a hat on the worst outcome. it's a little under half an hour. >> confederate
in the archives and will be available to the public after the end of the obama administration. >> what about the campaign video, that is private though, right? >> have to figure that out still. the dnc kept all the stuff in 2008 and give it back to the campaign when it reignited. now that the campaign is seemingly over the president you are finished the last campaign where the footage goes is interesting. i'm hoping it will be donated to the obama presidential library whenever that start to take form. . . >> harvard professor, randall kennedy nerd is selling book company and/or time of the strange career of a troublesome word. you write about violence by speech. what do you mean? >> guest: that book is about the word nigger and is a word that is triggered lots of violence and to some it is the final word in another cells. what i wanted to do in that book was to give a history of this word that has been covered with blood literally and sometimes figuratively and wanted to show the way in which this word has wrought havoc in american culture. of course that is not all it does. one of the reaso
of the nominations, any related statements be printed in the record and that president obama be immediately notified of the senate's action. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent the veterans' affairs committee be discharged from further consideration of presidential nomination 2024, that the nomination be confirmed, the motion to reconsider be considered made and laid on the table with no intervening action or debate, and no further motions be in order to the nomination, any related statements be printed in the record and president obama be immediately notified of the senate's action and the senate then resume legislative session. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: mr. president, i ask unanimous consent that the armed services committee be discharged from further consideration of h.r. 139 -- i'm sorry. 1339. we now proceed to this matter. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: h.r. 1339, an act to designate the city of salem, massachusetts, as the birthplace of the national guard of the united states. the presiding officer: is
a balance sheet analysis of things, we'll change. i was campaigning for president obama in seattle and was with a amazing supportive housing organization there that showed they had 23 homeless people that they looked at their medical expenses, um, for the year before they came into their supportive housing and the year after. 23 people, they saved their local hospital a million dollars in medical expenses was we all -- because we all know it's far more expensive to leave somebody, especially if they have a mental health issue and other things, it's far more expensive leaving them on the street than to come in and empower them. and this is what the study didn't really do. it talked about medical expenses, but i went to visit some of the residents. i went one man who now was volunteering, who now was teaching people about cooking and making contributions. so we have a backwards way of thinking about this. this is why i think our criminal justice system in america is the most -- if you're a republican, that should b be your biggest cause to go after because it's big, wasteful governme
you for coming, mr. meacham. i have a jefferson question and an obama question. when, during jefferson's time, a lot of new territory came into the united states, and the question of whether it would be slave or free, what were the political factions that were kind of tugging at jefferson, and what political considerations ultimately led to his decision of whether the new territory would be slave or free? and then the obama question, on charlie rose you talked about these dinners that the president has for journalists and historians. what do you guys talk about? [laughter] what does he, what does he say to you, what do you say to him? >> oh, i've never been invited, so i don't know. [laughter] you're right, somebody there was. bob care row, i -- caro, i think. we look a lot alike. [laughter] as i like to say to bob, my guys all died really a long time ago. [laughter] it's a great question. joety cantor, the i think, has been writing on this in the times, and i think -- what i've heard about the obama dinners is, like all presidents, you know, you get behind that desk which is an unpara
? >> by all appearances, it was a status quo election. returning us to the division of power, obama and the white house, democrats in control of the senate and republicans in the house. but appearances can be deceiving and in this case they are. the most important reality of the election is that the republican effort to oppose anything and everything proposed by obama, almost like the parliamentary party, was not rewarding and taking the debt ceiling hostage was not rewarded. calling the obama health care plan, which was their own only a few years earlier, socialism was not reported. that means they have to begin to rethink themselves and importantly, democrats will not automatically embrace the same tactics in opposition, so i think that was an important change that creates a new dynamic, not that it's going to solve our problems. there's going to be no sitting around the camp liar and washington making nice to one another, but the possibility now exists for a real effort and a successful effort to deal with our most pressing problems. >> two familiar washington faces, thomas mann
in archives will be available to public after the end of the obama administration. >> what about the campaign video? is private, though, right? convicted dnc kept all this to from 2008 and gave it back to the campaign would reignited. .. we're on the red carpet. finalist in poetry, young adult literature, nonfiction, and fiction books, and of course being booktv, we focus on the nonfiction. we want to let you know who some of the nine fiction finalist are. domingo martinez, his book is "boy kings of texas." his fourth volume on the lbj legacy, and robert caro appeared on q & a and at the national book festival in september. the late anthony shadid has been nominated. he died in syria while covering syria for the washington post. his wife will be here representing him, and that's nada bachary. katherine boo has been nominated, "behind the beautiful forever," about mumbai, and anne applebaum has a book out and is scheduled on our q & a show in september. so we'll be interviewing those authors as we go. we'll be watching the red carpet here as some of the authors have their picture taken. right
, returning us to the division of power; obama in the white house, democrats in control of the senate, republicans of the house. but appearances can be deceiving, and in this case are. the most important reality of the election is that the republican effort to oppose anything and everything proposed by obama -- almost like a parliamentary party -- was not rewarded. the taking the debt ceiling hostage was not rewarded, calling the obama health care plan which was their own only a few years earlier socialism was not rewarded. that was not they have to begin to rethink themselves and, importantly, democrats will not automatically embrace the same tactics in opposition. so i think that was an important change that creates a new dynamic not that's going to solve our problems. there's going to be no sitting around the campfire in washington making nice to one another. but the possibility now exists for a real effort and a successful effort to deal with our most pressing problems. >> two familiar washington faces, thomas mann and norm ornstein, "it's even worse than it looks." this is booktv
clinton, barack obama all said that it was an individual right. 75% of the american people thought it was an individual right including those liberal politicians thought it was. other than getting rid of the d.c. law and the chicago law what difference did it make? >> guest: that's interesting. to me that as a surprise because a lot of gun control but it said tougher with of those decisions that there would probably be a tsunami i think was the word the was used of challenges to gun control regulations. well, they're have been some, but there's certainly not in a tidal wave of them and they haven't mostly succeeded here in the district. the past and decided on a new set of regulations the still band the assault weapons and make it necessary you have to show that you know how to use a gun and can store it safely and have to register it and so on, and the -- there is a challenge to that that i don't think has been resolved yet. >> host: i know of at least a couple hundred lawsuits in the country and they move slowly but still almost every one of the has upheld the law. >> guest: it d
. >> i wondered about obama's national export initiative, doubling them by 2014 if i'm correctly. >> i didn't plant the question. [laughter] >> so i was just wondering, first of all, what do we export? like, what would you say are the strengths where you export, and secondly, what do you think can be done by the government or other institutions in order to promote the exports that the goal can be reached? >> that's a great question. so one of the things that we export very well is planes. we export machinery, complex machinery. we export medical equipment. people are often shocked to learn, you know, what most people guess what we export, they guess weapons. that's actually not true. we are much more ideal deny istic -- idealistic as a nation. planes are less complex equipment with manufacturing. what's the challenges? exports under this administration are up about 32% over the last three years. they deserve credit, and it's also because we're coming out of a huge depression and some of the currency, one is education, and we have to have people at our manufacturers take export seriousl
president obama who had a father -- it was an extraordinary openness actually. >> you know, i think we talk about it a lot. you know, i liked it when i was a kid. you didn't talk about it a lot. you lived your life. that to me -- we talk a lot about this person is that, this person is this. and then we pretended -- we i liked it when people didn't care. you -- i was catholic. you talk about a minority within a minority, within a minority. i was a black catholic in savannah, georgia. [laughter] now that is a what is an insular . >> discreet. >> insular minority. so but nobody bothered us. i was the only black kid in my seminary 1965. '64 there was another young man. i was there by myself for two years in savannah. nobody bothered me. i hear people say these things about their tolerance. there are identifying who is what a lot more. the -- i kind of like the idea that when you started, here you and i, neither one of us is caucasian. nobody is pointing it out. we pointed it out and said you are indian dissent. i don't know what people say. people say horrible things. i'm not black, so i'm a li
leave to have the designated meeting with president obama. mr. cochran: mr. president, let me join with the senator from maryland in commending all senators for the expeditious way we've been able to move this bill but particularly the chairwoman herself, who's provided strong leadership, capable leadership, fairness, a sense of fairness for all senators, and i thank her for the honor of serving with her on this committee. the presiding officer: under the previous order, the senate senatorses can attend the weekly caucus meetings. this morning they approve and extension of the farm intelligence v it allows the government to continue intercepting overseas communication. it extends legal immunity phone companies that help the government wiretap the domestic phone calls. president obama plans to sign the bill. when the senate is back we are expecting senators to continued work on the $60 billion hurricane sandy relief package. negotiations continue on avoiding the so-called fiscal cliff. both parties head to the white house today to discuss the fiscal cliff with the president. it's at
the stuff. >> only president obama who had a father -- it was an extraordinary openness actually. >> you know, i think we talk about it a lot. you know, i liked it when i was a kid. you didn't talk about it a lot. you lived your life. that to me -- we talk a lot about this person is that, this person is this. and then we pretended -- we i liked it when people didn't care. you -- i was catholic. you talk about a minority within a minority, within a minority. i was a black catholic in savannah, georgia. [laughter] now that is a what is an insular . >> discreet. >> insular minority. so but nobody bothered us. i was the only black kid in my seminary 1965. '64 there was another young man. i was there by myself for two years in savannah. nobody bothered me. i hear people say these things about their tolerance. there are identifying who is what a lot more. the -- i kind of like the idea that when you started, here you and i, neither one of us is caucasian. nobody is pointing it out. we pointed it out and said you are indian dissent. i don't know what people say. people say horrible things. i'm
was running out to pass gun control laws. hillary clinton, barack obama, said it was an individual right. 75% of the american people thought it was an individual right. 95% of the politicians, including those liberal politicians thought it was. other than getting rid of the d.c. law and then the chicago la law what difference did it make? >> guest: well, that's interesting to me that's a surprise because a lot of gun control advdvates said, after the decision -- after both those decisions, probably the tsunami i think was the word that was used -- of challenges to gun control regulations. well there have been some, but certainly not been a tidal wave of them and they haven't mostlied anded. here in the district, they passed -- decided on a new set of regulations that still ban assault weapons, and make it necessary you have to learn -- show you know how to use a gun and can store it safely and register it and so on. but -- and there is a challenge to that i don't think has been resolved yet. >> host: there have been at least a couple hundred lind suis across the country, and lind sus move s
couldn't believe what they were saying that obama was probably going to win and that most democratic senate candidates were going to win. they were shellshocked in their own words, and if they cannot sort of accept the in critical reality, they are going to be in big trouble in the succeeding election. >> democrats became useless? >> well, they become useless and that they become the party of me too but less in that after three successive losses in the presidential elections in the 80's they kind of retool and become more friendly and many people think, and i happen to be one of them, for all but obama has excoriated as a kind of muslim and socialist that once, she's pretty much fulfiled george bush's third term in the national security matters. >> finally how does the middle class figure in to your thesis? >> the middle class figures and they are the ones that got shafted because there was a bipartisan move. clinton was president, the republicans mainly were running the congress when we had things like nafta, china most favored nation status, the wto, the world trade organization, a
anybody who's interested in immigration or in politics in america. >> host: parallels to barack obama? >> guest: no doubt, um, humble circumstances. no doubt this whole question of identity is significant, you know, it's clear that from the people i spoke to who knew marco when he was in high school, um, that he looked up to some of these young boys who he was playing on the football team with who had come from cuba and had had those experiences of living under a difficult regime, you know? in his high school there was such a large number of cuban-americans that when something happened on the island, castro was in the news, it was all the buzz in the hallways. and that really had a form betive effect on him -- formative effect on him. and being a part of that meant something to him. and being a part of that group, it's a very powerful, powerful lure. >> host: we are here in miami, and we've been talking with manuel roig-franzia, "the rise of marco rubio," an unauthorized biography as you say. thank you for being on booktv. >> guest: it was a great pleasure to see you again. >> tell us
for president obama in seattle with it amazing support organization there that shows 23 homeless people looked at medical expenses the year before and the year after. 23 people they saved $1 million of medical expenses because it is far more expensive especially with mental health to leave them on the street this is what the study did not do but it by a that one man who was teaching people about cooking. we have babe backwards way to think that if you are a republican it should be biggest cause it is wasteful government propelled. >> we will make you late so i will off per one thought and give you the last word. would reverse meant i remember saying i like your tie. you took it off and give it to me. i think you offer that your country. you offer your light to those signed letter but those all across the country inspired buy you and the late that you draw us to with hope and optimism i was stumped when an acreage a woman said it is the really as sexy? [laughter] i said. >> i look much better from faraway. [laughter] >> 84 the light you have shared with us but also to the nation. but for hope
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